Categories
Advice

Return to Work under COVID-19

All UK businesses have been impacted by the coronavirus pandemic and this has forced many to close while the Stay at Home campaign is in place.  If your company is fortunate enough to consider a return to work soon then, SoPro Safety has compiled a free checklist which may be useful.

We have published this aid to restarting a closed business to help you consider some of the arrangements that the ‘different normal’ may impose on us for the future such as social distancing in the workplace.  Hopefully it will nudge you to review the topics you need to work through to keep colleagues and customers healthy and safe.

Those who require tailored support in these difficult times only need to ask us for further guidance to help the transition from closed and furloughed to a steady and safe re-opening of the business.

You can receive this by completing the form on this page.

Contact us if you are looking for assistance.

Categories
Advice Outsource

Brexit and Legislation

Your duties to protect the health and safety of people affected by your work will not change with Brexit.

HSE’s guidance, health and safety made simple: the basics for your business, will help you to comply with the law.

You should continue to manage risk in your business in a proportionate way.

They have made minor amendments to regulations to remove EU references but legal requirements will remain the same as they are now. Health and safety standards will be maintained.

If management of health and safety is something your business struggles with; contact SoPro Safety now for proportionate and pragmatic advice or support. 

Categories
Advice Events Industry Outsource

New regulations to include Events and Exhibitions

The new Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM Regs) come into force in April.  Events and exhibitions of scale will fall within the scope of these regulations and the HSE is drafting guidance specifically for the events industry.  The draft regulations have been published, however the exact impact on our events and exhibitions industry is still taking shape.

We expect there to be better formalisation of the responsibilities of the client and their appointed organisers and/or main contractors.  For well run projects this should be a fairly simple matter to comply…

From the HSE:

The new CDM Regs come into force on 6 April 2015 and apply to all building and construction projects, regardless of the size, duration and nature of the work.

The main changes, outlined in general by the Health & Safety Executive, are as follows:

  • Principal designer. The replacement of CDM co-ordinator (under CDM 2007) by principal designer. This means that the responsibility for  coordination of the pre-construction phase – which is crucial to the management of any successful construction project – will rest with an existing member of the design team. 
  • Client. The new Regulations recognise the influence and importance of the client as the head of the supply chain and as the party best placed to set standards throughout a project 
  • CompetenceBy splitting ‘competence’ into its component parts of skills, knowledge, training and experience, and  – if they are an organisation – organisational capability, provides clarity for the industry to assess and demonstrate that construction project teams have the right attributes to deliver a healthy and safe project. 
  • The technical standards set out in Part 4 remain essentially unchanged from CDM 2007 and HSE’s targeting and enforcement policy, as a proportionate and modern regulator, also remains unchanged.

The Regulatory package

The new proposed Regulations and supporting guidance are all in draft form before they come into force and may be subject to changes. They offer duty holders the opportunity to familiarise themselves with the main requirements before they come into force.

Categories
Advice Industry

Health and Safety update

We recently gained a fascinating insight into the current and probable changes that are taking place with health and safety legislation and the work of the Health and Safety Executive.

Suffice to say with their budget being cut by the order of a third that the effect is best summed up as – fewer inspections, increased costs from interventions, jailing of senior management in prosecuted cases and higher profile/higher value prosecutions.

As an indication we understand that the HSE’s budget for FFI was about £30m – they only recovered a third of this so expect bigger fines to be levied. The FFI initiative is here to stay and may extend to local authority departments to engage in the interventions. The average fee for intervention was billed as approximately £490 but one case lead to a fee of £21,000.

Food for thought.

If you wish to talk about what it might mean for you please contact us.