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Advice

2m is still the right thing to do

Update following the government guidance for further easing on 4 July

Just because the phrase “further easing of social distancing to 1m+” has been introduced doesn’t mean the 2m social distancing rule has been abandoned.  2m distancing is still required in businesses except where it is not viable, then it can be 1m+ and the plus mean further risk mitigation. 

Mitigation arrangements could include increased handwashing, surface and equipment cleaning, screens to separate specific activity/working areas, consistent pairing, reduction in the time spent in proximity, avoidance of the face-to-face in preference to side-by-side, staggering of timed activities (shifts, appointments, break times etc), reducing congestion and increased ventilation.

If you are intending to amend your arrangements don’t forget to update your COVID Secure Risk Assessment. 

If you need a written risk assessment, an update to you current arrangements or further advice on any aspects of health and safety etc, SoPro Safety is ready and available to assist you.

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Advice

Up and Running

COVID-19 Secure Workplace Risk Assessments

For one of our Bridal client hearts are a clever way to remind customers to social distance

We are delighted that some of our clients are now back in business. It’s been a long time coming with much hard work and thought being put in to ensure that businesses are COVID-19 Secure workplaces, ready and safe to receive customers.

For us it’s been a fascinating time, ploughing through government, PHE and HSE guidance to find the best route for our clients and to give maximum assistance in drafting the important COVID-19 Secure workplace risk assessments.  As always, we advise our clients to involve all staff members in the drafting and  implementing of work arrangements and some of our video calls have been pretty lively…

We also advise that the process must be ongoing – we hate a dusty H&S file sitting on a shelf. We suggest pithy, short guidelines for staff with regular follow ups.

We are also providing our clients with our new “check-in” service, a vital reminder for our clients to keep monitoring their arrangements to check they are working and being actioned. We don’t like to call it nagging more of a gentle nudge.  Our clients tell us this is a service they really value as often time is limited and health and safety matters can start to slip. In a world of pandemic this can’t afford to happen.

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Advice

COVID Secure

In the new Government guidance, released yesterday, you should share the results of your COVID Risk Assessment with your workforce.  If possible you should consider publishing the results on your website and display it in your workplace to show you have followed the guidance.

The guidance is published for eight different sectors.

Contact us if you are finding all of the updates overwhelming, we are here to provide tailored advice and support, to make it easier for you to comply and keep your workforce safe.

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Advice

Return to Work under COVID-19

All UK businesses have been impacted by the coronavirus pandemic and this has forced many to close while the Stay at Home campaign is in place.  If your company is fortunate enough to consider a return to work soon then, SoPro Safety has compiled a free checklist which may be useful.

We have published this aid to restarting a closed business to help you consider some of the arrangements that the ‘different normal’ may impose on us for the future such as social distancing in the workplace.  Hopefully it will nudge you to review the topics you need to work through to keep colleagues and customers healthy and safe.

Those who require tailored support in these difficult times only need to ask us for further guidance to help the transition from closed and furloughed to a steady and safe re-opening of the business.

You can receive this by completing the form on this page.

Contact us if you are looking for assistance.

Categories
Advice Health

Stay Home and Stay Safe

COVID-19 isolating at home can mean that you may be tempted to do more and more at home a) to keep busy and b) stimulated and interested.  Take care that you do not stretch yourself too far and put yourself in other dangers.

Now that so much national effort is going into fighting the virus we need to stay safe so that we do not unwittingly add additional or different pressures on the healthcare resources by having an accident in the home or garden.

Stay safe!

Categories
Advice Health

COVID-19 Official UK Guidance

Guidance from Public Health England and Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy for employers and business

A coronavirus is a type of virus. As a group, coronaviruses are common across the world. COVID-19 is a new strain of coronavirus first identified in Wuhan City, China in January 2020.

The incubation period of COVID-19 is between 2 to 14 days. This means that if a person remains well 14 days after contact with someone with confirmed coronavirus, they have not been infected.

Signs and symptoms of COVID-19

The following symptoms may develop in the 14 days after exposure to someone who has COVID-19 infection:

  • cough
  • difficulty in breathing
  • fever

Generally, these infections can cause more severe symptoms in people with weakened immune systems, older people, and those with long-term conditions like diabetes, cancer and chronic lung disease.

How COVID-19 is spread

From what we know about other coronaviruses, spread of COVID-19 is most likely to happen when there is close contact (within 2 metres or less) with an infected person. It is likely that the risk increases the longer someone has close contact with an infected person.

Respiratory secretions produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes containing the virus are most likely to be the main means of transmission.

There are 2 main routes by which people can spread COVID-19:

  • infection can be spread to people who are nearby (within 2 metres) or possibly could be inhaled into the lungs.
  • it is also possible that someone may become infected by touching a surface, object or the hand of an infected person that has been contaminated with respiratory secretions and then touching their own mouth, nose, or eyes (such as touching door knob or shaking hands then touching own face)

There is currently little evidence that people who are without symptoms are infectious to others.

Preventing spread of infection

There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus.

Public Health England (PHE) recommends that the following general cold and flu precautions are taken to help prevent people from catching and spreading COVID-19:

  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze. See Catch it, Bin it, Kill it
  • put used tissues in the bin straight away
  • wash your hands with soap and water often – use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available. See hand washing guidance
  • try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell
  • clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces
  • do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

If you are worried about symptoms, please call NHS 111. Do not go directly to your GP or other healthcare environment.

Further information is available on the PHE blog and NHS.UK.

Face masks for the general public are not recommended to protect from infection, as there is no evidence of benefit from their use outside healthcare environments.

People who have returned from Hubei Province, including Wuhan, in the last 14 days should self-isolate whether they have symptoms or not. This includes avoiding attending an education setting or work until 14 days after they leave Hubei Province.

People who have returned from Hubei Province, including Wuhan, in the last 14 days should avoid attending work. They should call NHS 111 for advice and self-isolate

Advice is in place for what to do if you have returned in the last 14 days from specified countries or areas which is being updated on an ongoing basis.

With regards to travel information to China or other countries for individuals working in the UK, we recommend following the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) country advice pages.

At present, FCO advises against all travel to Hubei Province due to the ongoing novel COVID-19 outbreak. The FCO also advises against all but essential travel to the rest of mainland China (not including Hong Kong and Macao).

How long the virus can survive

How long any respiratory virus survives will depend on a number of factors, for example:

  • what surface the virus is on
  • whether it is exposed to sunlight
  • differences in temperature and humidity
  • exposure to cleaning products

Under most circumstances, the amount of infectious virus on any contaminated surfaces is likely to have decreased significantly by 72 hours.

We know that similar viruses are transferred to and by people’s hands. Therefore, regular hand hygiene and cleaning of frequently touched surfaces will help to reduce the risk of infection.

See hand washing guidance.

Guidance on facemasks

Employees are not recommended to wear facemasks (also known as surgical masks or respirators) to protect against the virus. Facemasks are only recommended to be worn by symptomatic individuals (advised by a healthcare worker) to reduce the risk of transmitting the infection to other people.

PHE recommends that the best way to reduce any risk of infection is good hygiene and avoiding direct or close contact (closer than 2 metres) with any potentially infected person.

Any member of staff who deals with members of the public from behind a full screen will be protected from airborne particles.

What to do if an employee or a member of the public becomes unwell and believe they have been exposed to COVID-19

If the person has not been to specified areas in the last 14 days, then normal practice should continue.

If someone becomes unwell in the workplace and has travelled to China or other affected countries, the unwell person should be removed to an area which is at least 2 metres away from other people. If possible find a room or area where they can be isolated behind a closed door, such as a staff office. If it is possible to open a window, do so for ventilation.

The individual who is unwell should call NHS 111 from their mobile, or 999 if an emergency (if they are seriously ill or injured or their life is at risk) and explain which country they have returned from in the last 14 days and outline their current symptoms.

Whilst they wait for advice from NHS 111 or an ambulance to arrive, they should remain at least 2 metres from other people. They should avoid touching people, surfaces and objects and be advised to cover their mouth and nose with a disposable tissue when they cough or sneeze and put the tissue in a bag or pocket then throw the tissue in the bin. If they don’t have any tissues available, they should cough and sneeze into the crook of their elbow.

If they need to go to the bathroom whilst waiting for medical assistance, they should use a separate bathroom if available.

Returning from travel overseas to affected areas

People who have returned from Hubei Province, including Wuhan, in the last 14 days should avoid attending work. They should call NHS 111 for advice and self-isolate

Advice is in place for what to do if you have returned in the last 14 days from specified countries or areas which is being updated on an ongoing basis.

All other staff should continue to attend work.

What to do if a member of staff or the public with suspected COVID-19 has recently been in your workplace

For contacts of a suspected case in the workplace, no restrictions or special control measures are required while laboratory test results for COVID19 are awaited. In particular, there is no need to close the workplace or send other staff home at this point. Most possible cases turn out to be negative. Therefore, until the outcome of test results is known there is no action that the workplace needs to take.

What to do if a member of staff or the public with confirmed COVID-19 has recently been in your workplace

Closure of the workplace is not recommended.

The management team of the office or workplace will be contacted by the PHE local Health Protection Team to discuss the case, identify people who have been in contact with them and advise on any actions or precautions that should be taken.

A risk assessment of each setting will be undertaken by the Health Protection Team with the lead responsible person. Advice on the management of staff and members of the public will be based on this assessment.

The Health Protection Team will also be in contact with the case directly to advise on isolation and identifying other contacts and will be in touch with any contacts of the case to provide them with appropriate advice.

Advice on cleaning of communal areas such as offices or toilets will be given by the Health Protection Team. and is outlined later in this document.

When individuals in the workplace have had contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19

If a confirmed case is identified in your workplace, the local Health Protection Team will provide the relevant staff with advice. These staff include:

  • any employee in close face-to-face or touching contact
  • talking with or being coughed on for any length of time while the employee was symptomatic
  • anyone who has cleaned up any bodily fluids
  • close friendship groups or workgroups
  • any employee living in the same household as a confirmed case

Contacts are not considered cases and if they are well they are very unlikely to have spread the infection to others:

  • those who have had close contact will be asked to self-isolate at home for 14 days from the last time they had contact with the confirmed case and follow the home isolation advice sheet
  • they will be actively followed up by the Health Protection Team
  • if they develop new symptoms or their existing symptoms worsen within their 14-day observation period they should call NHS 111 for reassessment
  • if they become unwell with cough, fever or shortness of breath they will be tested for COVID-19
  • if they are unwell at any time within their 14-day observation period and they test positive for COVID-19 they will become a confirmed case and will be treated for the infection

Staff who have not had close contact with the original confirmed case do not need to take any precautions and can continue to attend work.

Certifying absence from work

By law, medical evidence is not required for the first 7 days of sickness. After 7 days, it is for the employer to determine what evidence they require, if any, from the employee. This does not need to be fit note (Med 3 form) issued by a GP or other doctor.

Your employee will be advised to isolate themselves and not to work in contact with other people by NHS 111 or PHE if they are a carrier of, or have been in contact with, an infectious or contagious disease, such as COVID-19.

We strongly suggest that employers use their discretion around the need for medical evidence for a period of absence where an employee is advised to self-isolate due to suspected COVID-19, in accordance with the public health advice being issued by the government.

Advice for staff returning from travel anywhere else in the world within the last 14 days

Currently, there are minimal cases outside the listed areas and therefore the likelihood of an individual coming into contact with a confirmed case is extremely low.

These staff can continue to attend work unless they have been informed that they have had contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19

If individuals are aware that they have had close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 they should contact NHS 111 for further advice.

The latest country information is available on the NaTHNac Travel Pro website.

Handling post, packages or food from affected areas

Employees should continue to follow existing risk assessments and safe systems of work. There is no perceived increase in risk for handling post or freight from specified areas.

Cleaning offices and public spaces where there are suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19

Coronavirus symptoms are similar to a flu-like illness and include cough, fever, or shortness of breath. Once symptomatic, all surfaces that the person has come into contact with must be cleaned including:

  • all surfaces and objects which are visibly contaminated with body fluids
  • all potentially contaminated high-contact areas such as toilets, door handles, telephones

Public areas where a symptomatic individual has passed through and spent minimal time in (such as corridors) but which are not visibly contaminated with body fluids do not need to be specially cleaned and disinfected.

If a person becomes ill in a shared space, these should be cleaned using disposable cloths and household detergents, according to current recommended workplace legislation and practice.

Rubbish disposal, including tissues

All waste that has been in contact with the individual, including used tissues, and masks if used, should be put in a plastic rubbish bag and tied when full. The plastic bag should then be placed in a second bin bag and tied. It should be put in a safe place and marked for storage until the result is available. If the individual tests negative, this can be put in the normal waste.

Should the individual test positive, you will be instructed what to do with the waste.

 

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Advice

Leave safety systems to chance?

An article in today’s IOSH news relates to the perils of allowing workers to make their own decisions about correct procedures for working on site.

As a company manager or director you are responsible for the undertakings of your workers – it will probably say so in your policy.  If one of your workers is allowed to start using plant that they are not trained to use, then what could happen next is up to you as mentioned above.  Crucially, will you do anything about it or let it go?

Normal health and safety arrangements such as risk assessment, safe systems of work, training and supervision are simple to implement when an organisation believes in the process.  However, we often see resistance to sensible arrangements being implemented and the reasons for failing to do so will range from lack of knowledge, peer-pressure, cost, perceived difficulty and insufficient time.  We have to believe that no one truly sets out to work in a dangerous way day after day but the perception of risk and the odds of it going wrong, when left to workers alone, can unfortunately have tragic results when an individual’s gamble doesn’t work out.

Its fine to gamble with money (that you can afford to lose) but its not acceptable to have workers gamble with each others lives and limbs, especially when they are working for you.  Workers are seldom qualified to make real risk judgments and will often make flawed assumptions about risk and consequences.

What might have started as a light touch regime with the company mentioned in the article to become a free for all without controls.

If you would like pragmatic advice about safety systems that you and your workers can apply on sites that you are responsible for then get in touch.  Or maybe its worth the gamble that nothing will go wrong … ?

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Advice Outsource

Brexit and Legislation

Your duties to protect the health and safety of people affected by your work will not change with Brexit.

HSE’s guidance, health and safety made simple: the basics for your business, will help you to comply with the law.

You should continue to manage risk in your business in a proportionate way.

They have made minor amendments to regulations to remove EU references but legal requirements will remain the same as they are now. Health and safety standards will be maintained.

If management of health and safety is something your business struggles with; contact SoPro Safety now for proportionate and pragmatic advice or support. 

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Advice Industry

Health and Safety Statistics

Key figures for Great Britain (2017/18)

The statistics for 2017-8 can be downloaded from the HSE website and make interesting reading.

Of course by taking reasonable steps to comply with legislation and your moral duties your business need not form part of these costly statistics and flourish as a safe effective and efficient business.

Contact us for advice and guidance to help you comply.

Categories
Advice Events

Event Safety

Safety is a key priority for any event and we help you to comply with legislation and to keep you, your suppliers, sub-contractors and visitors safe.

We provide advice, training, support and audit on Health & Safety and how it effects event planning and delivery.

Before the Event

  • Policy advice
  • Implementation and compliance
  • Risk assessments and method statements
  • Operational planning
  • Emergency procedures
  • Build up/break down logistics
  • Contractor supervision
  • Health and Safety Advisors

On Site

  • Safety Officers – NEBOSH qualified
  • IOSH qualified floor managers
  • Crowd management
  • Emergency procedures
  • Contractor and exhibitor supervision
  • Health and Safety “i-announcements”

After the Event

  • Event debrief and H&S reports
  • Accident investigation and incident reports
  • Policy revision